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Lisa Bergant Koi's abstract paintings depict indeterminate spaces developed from her primary source material: drawings she makes of the highway landscape as a passenger in a car.

With intent observation, she records the way particular shapes and lines in the landscape appear to shift as she moves toward them. Her paintings are layered accumulations of individual marks replicated from any number of these drawings. She begins each piece by painting randomly selected lines and shapes with little thought. Over time the marks become intentionally selected and configured on the canvas to meet the pictorial needs of the painting. Whether randomly or intentionally selected, the lines and shapes must meet her criteria of not being readily identifiable as particular objects. In fact, the greater the feeling of ambiguity and peculiarity they add to the composition, the better.

Her in-process decisions are also influenced by her interest in the physiology and psychology of visual perception - how we see and how we interpret what we see. She finds the manner in which she amalgamates these abstract marks similar to the way our minds configure visually collected information into our personal versions of reality. This notion is furthered by her use of non-naturalistic color and non-suggestive titles which intentionally promote and acknowledge each viewer's individualized interpretation.

 

Lisa earned an MA in painting from Illinois State University and a BFA from Bowling Green State University. She has exhibited nationally and her work is held in private collections as well as the corporate collections of both PNC Bank and The Benter Foundation. She is an exhibiting member of the following professional organizations: Associated Artists of Pittsburgh, Group A Collective, and Pittsburgh Society of Artists.

 

 

 

 

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Image of studio by Nathan Shaulis